7 reasons to see Filigree and Shadow
Simon Plant and Alice Topp. Photography Justin Ridler

7 reasons to see Filigree and Shadow

Tim Harbour, one of The Australian Ballet’s three resident choreographers, is bringing the 21st century to our 20:21 triple bill with his brand-new work Filigree and Shadow. So what’s it all about, and why do you need to see it?

The filigree
Reflecting the pace of information in the modern age, Tim’s choreography is fast, dense, multi-focused and intricate. He says, “A lot of the movement sits in the upper body, and the articulation you can get just from using your wrists, fingers, elbows and shoulders. That creates a kind of filigree around the core form of the torso and the legs – those arms create an embroidery around the body.”

Simon Plant. Photography Justin Ridler

Simon Plant. Photography Justin Ridler

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29 July 2015

The Sleeping Beauty: We’re so excited!
Costume for the Lilac Fairy. Photography Kate Longley

The Sleeping Beauty: We’re so excited!

With only two months to go until the world premiere of The Sleeping Beauty, our staff are getting a little beside themselves! We asked them what they’re most looking forward to about this brand-new production of the ultimate fairytale ballet.

Yvonne Gates, Director of Special Projects
I am waiting with anticipation to see how David, as the director, handles the dramatic content and story-telling of the ballet. As a dancer he was a brilliant actor and I am sure that he will bring all of his knowledge and experience to this production to make his Beauty something truly exceptional.

Jemma Wong, Senior Marketing Manager
There’s such a history and nostalgia around fairytales, particularly The Sleeping Beauty. I can’t wait to see David go beyond the story and really create an entire universe of movement and colour. What do I hope for? Audiences to leap to their feet and cheer, for little kids to fall in love and for our dancers to dance their hearts out. (more…)

15 July 2015

First glimpse: Garland Dancer

First glimpse: Garland Dancer

In David McAllister’s new production of The Sleeping Beauty, even the minor characters are dressed with fairytale charm. The Garland Dancers are couples who dance with hoops of flowers at Aurora’s 16th birthday, and for the female of the pair, Gabriela Tylesova has designed this sumptuous garden of a dress. (more…)

14 July 2015

Keto: new activewear for The Australian Ballet
Principal Artist Lana Jones in Keto for The Australian Ballet. Photography Ren Pidgeon

Keto: new activewear for The Australian Ballet

Keto is a brand-new Australian dancewear label, created by Soloist of The Australian Ballet Jacob Sofer and his partner, designer Peggy Jackson. Today the company launches its very first collection, a capsule line of six pieces created exclusively for The Australian Ballet. Developed in consultation with our dancers, the pieces will take you from the ballet studio to the gym and beyond. We sat down with Keto to learn more about construction, why it was so important to manufacture in Australia, and how the demands of Jacob’s fellow dancers shaped the garments.

Principal Artist Adam Bull in Keto for The Australian Ballet. Photography Ren Pidgeon

Principal Artist Adam Bull in Keto for The Australian Ballet. Photography Ren Pidgeon

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13 July 2015

John Lanchbery and ballet music: A perfect combination
Artists of The Australian Ballet in Frederick Ashton's The Dream. Photography Kate Longley

John Lanchbery and ballet music: A perfect combination

Lee Christofis investigates the unique genius behind some of the best-loved versions of ballet’s classic scores.

The name of John Lanchbery OBE (1922 – 2003) has been inextricably linked with The Australian Ballet since 1970, the year he conducted the company’s American tour of Rudolf Nureyev’s Don Quixote to rapturous applause. (more…)

9 July 2015

The Devil made me do it

The Devil made me do it

As we approach our last performances of Giselle for 2015, we thought we’d revist Robert le diable and the sensual nuns that inspired the Romantic era’s battalions of ghostly women.

Ghostly women dressed in white, their heads veiled and their arms crossed in front of their chests. A distant church and a gravestone, both lit by moonlight. The women emerging from their final resting place to dance in formation as they try to entrap a man who stumbles into their midst.

Surely this must be the setting for the second act of Giselle, where the wilis, the ghosts of jilted brides, are compelled to destroy any man who comes near them in the hours between sunset and dawn?

But it’s not. The inspiration for Giselle, the most famous ballet of the Romantic age, and its predecessor, La Sylphide, was an opera that took Paris by storm in 1831. Robert le diable, composed by Giacomo Meyerbeer, was the precursor to La Sylphide and Giselle, two iconic ballets whose collaborators drew on the most scandalous scene of the opera. (more…)

2 July 2015